Now You're Afraid of the Dark

Molly // Anthony // Bizarre

The hot springs found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park’s thermal areas are bubbling cauldrons of steam and boiling water, most of them hotter than 150°F, and many of them in the 185°-205°F range. (Due to the elevation, water boils at about 198° in Yellowstone.) Nineteen scalding deaths have been recorded in connection with Yellowstone’s hot springs since 1870, all of them known or believed to have involved people who inadvertently fell into the springs through accident or carelessness — save one. On 20 July 1981, 24-year-old David Allen Kirwan from La Canada, California, was driving through Yellowstone’s Fountain Paint Pot thermal area with his friend Ronald Ratliff and Ratliff’s dog Moosie. At about 1:00 P.M. they parked their truck to get out and take a closer look at the hot springs; Moosie escaped from the truck, ran towards nearby Celestine Pool (a thermal spring whose water temperature has been measured at over 200°), jumped in, and began yelping. Kirwan and Ratliff rushed over to the pool to aid the terrified dog, and Kirwan’s attitude indicated he was about to go into the spring after it. According to bystanders, several people tried to warn Kirwan off by yelling at him not to jump in, but he shouted “Like hell I won’t!” back at them, took two steps into the pool, and then dove head-first into the boiling spring. Kirwan swam out to the dog and attempted to take it to shore; he then disappeared underwater, let go of the dog, and tried to climb out of the pool. Ratliff helped pull Kirwan out of the hot spring (resulting in second-degree burns to his own feet), and another visitor led Kirwan to the sidewalk as he reportedly muttered, “That was stupid. How bad am I? That was a stupid thing I did.” Kirwan was indeed in very bad shape. He was blind, and when another park visitor tried to remove one of his shoes, his skin (which was already peeling everywhere) came off with it. He sustained third-degree burns to 100% of his body, including his head, and died the following morning at a Salt Lake City hospital. (Moosie did not survive, either.)

Perhaps David Allen Kirwan didn’t realize just how hot the thermal springs really are, perhaps he didn’t consider the deadly effect submersion in water of such temperatures would have on him, or perhaps blind emotion drove him to act without taking even the briefest moment to consider his own safety. Foolish, brave, rash, or otherwise, can any of us imagine a circumstance, no matter how dire, under which would willingly dive head-first into a pool of boiling water? 
Source.

The hot springs found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park’s thermal areas are bubbling cauldrons of steam and boiling water, most of them hotter than 150°F, and many of them in the 185°-205°F range. (Due to the elevation, water boils at about 198° in Yellowstone.) Nineteen scalding deaths have been recorded in connection with Yellowstone’s hot springs since 1870, all of them known or believed to have involved people who inadvertently fell into the springs through accident or carelessness — save one. 

On 20 July 1981, 24-year-old David Allen Kirwan from La Canada, California, was driving through Yellowstone’s Fountain Paint Pot thermal area with his friend Ronald Ratliff and Ratliff’s dog Moosie. At about 1:00 P.M. they parked their truck to get out and take a closer look at the hot springs; Moosie escaped from the truck, ran towards nearby Celestine Pool (a thermal spring whose water temperature has been measured at over 200°), jumped in, and began yelping. Kirwan and Ratliff rushed over to the pool to aid the terrified dog, and Kirwan’s attitude indicated he was about to go into the spring after it. According to bystanders, several people tried to warn Kirwan off by yelling at him not to jump in, but he shouted “Like hell I won’t!” back at them, took two steps into the pool, and then dove head-first into the boiling spring. Kirwan swam out to the dog and attempted to take it to shore; he then disappeared underwater, let go of the dog, and tried to climb out of the pool. Ratliff helped pull Kirwan out of the hot spring (resulting in second-degree burns to his own feet), and another visitor led Kirwan to the sidewalk as he reportedly muttered, “That was stupid. How bad am I? That was a stupid thing I did.” Kirwan was indeed in very bad shape. He was blind, and when another park visitor tried to remove one of his shoes, his skin (which was already peeling everywhere) came off with it. He sustained third-degree burns to 100% of his body, including his head, and died the following morning at a Salt Lake City hospital. (Moosie did not survive, either.)

Perhaps David Allen Kirwan didn’t realize just how hot the thermal springs really are, perhaps he didn’t consider the deadly effect submersion in water of such temperatures would have on him, or perhaps blind emotion drove him to act without taking even the briefest moment to consider his own safety. Foolish, brave, rash, or otherwise, can any of us imagine a circumstance, no matter how dire, under which would willingly dive head-first into a pool of boiling water? 

Source.

dead-mans-trigger:

haetae:

The Medical Pathology Museum of Tokyo University contains a collection of around 105 preserved human skins tattooed in the traditional Japanese style, including a number of full body suits.
http://sitesofmemory.tumblr.com/post/36610985742/

photo source:
http://lifeand6months.com/2012/11/01/the-tattoo-collectors-film-fiction/

I find this disturbing yet fascinating…

I wanna be skinned and my tattoos be put on display
mediumaevum:

The Breast Ripper is a torture device that was very popular in Bavaria. The one depicted here is a 15th century example from the torture museum in Freiburg im Breisgau. Heated iron was used to mutilate women’s breasts if they were accused of adultery or self-abortion.
A particularly painful version is the so called Spanish Spider.
 

mediumaevum:

The Breast Ripper is a torture device that was very popular in Bavaria. The one depicted here is a 15th century example from the torture museum in Freiburg im Breisgau. Heated iron was used to mutilate women’s breasts if they were accused of adultery or self-abortion.

A particularly painful version is the so called Spanish Spider.

 

http://imgur.com/a/KLpxV

A woman with schizophrenia displaying hypergraphia.

(Source: tumblr.com)

compoundchem:

This graphic looks at a selection of the chemicals used as either irritant or poisonous agents during World War 1, including chlorine, phosgene and mustard gas. You can read more about them, and see a larger version of the graphic, right here.

compoundchem:

This graphic looks at a selection of the chemicals used as either irritant or poisonous agents during World War 1, including chlorine, phosgene and mustard gas. You can read more about them, and see a larger version of the graphic, right here.

In a bizarre twist of events, a dog jumping from the balcony of a 13th floor apartment resulted in a chain-reaction that killed the dog and three other people.
Source. (X-Post from r/wtf)

In a bizarre twist of events, a dog jumping from the balcony of a 13th floor apartment resulted in a chain-reaction that killed the dog and three other people.

Source. (X-Post from r/wtf)

The Phoenix news helicopter collision happened in 2007, as two news AS-350 AStar helicopters were following a police chase. As the helicopter’s camera was pointed at the action on the ground, viewers did not see the other aircraft. KNXV pilot-reporter Craig Smith and anchor Rebecca Thomas were describing events live when Smith was heard to exclaim “Oh, geez!” as the image broke up and violent crashing noises were heard. The station immediately cut away to the studio news anchor, although screaming can be heard in the background before the link is cut off. In footage from the KTVK helicopter, viewers heard the pilot talking about the scene and then the picture just went black. There was no indication of a problem at all. Three other news helicopters from other stations (KSAZKPNX and KPHO) were in the area and began reporting on the crash within seconds of it occurring. Four people were killed: KTVK pilot Scott Bowerbank and photographer Jim Cox; and pilot Craig Smith and photographer Rick Krolak of KNXV. No one on the ground was injured.

Source.

Anonymous asked:
Where are the sources to your posts? It'd be nice to know where you get the info from.

done as requested

xx Molly

Reed Family Abduction

The historic UFO case of the Reed Family, was assigned a Vallee classification of “CE4” (close encounter of the 4th kind), with a case category of 3 (physical evidence). The case has many layers and is deeply entwined and remains one of a few CE4 cases to be mentioned within the walls of the United Nations. The evidence in this case would include a significant amount of radiation, and strong magnetic fields, and is one of a few to have been collected and documented by those in law enforcement. The history involves Marian Burrows, grandmother, Nancy Reed, mother, and the two brothers, Thom and Matthew. In the quaint town of Sheffield, Massachusetts, in the 1960’s, Thomas, age 6, and his younger brother Matthew, experienced life altering events. Both have conscious memories of the lengthy experiences with non-human entities, and being taken aboard a tarnished circular looking vessel where an image of a willow tree was displayed, and still remains embedded in the mind of Thomas to this day. During a fall evening, in Massachusetts, and after a barrage of bright bursts of light, a flash fired through their bedroom window, Thom was engulfed and Matthew was now speaking to an empty bed. An odd stillness accompanied the light, and seemed to be what left their mother, Nancy, and their grandmother, Marian, in a cataleptic state, in an adjacent room. Matthew ran to his mother, only to find her in this unresponsive state from which he could not wake her. Once she partially regained her senses, Nancy headed to the boys’ bedroom, but before reaching the room, heard a cross between a loud screech and a door slamming. Matthew was no longer beside her. Now alone in the home with only the grandmother Marian, who stayed at home while Nancy began to frantically search their 80-acre horse farm on horseback, where she eventually spotted them from the Appalachian Trail. Thom and Matthew were about 15 feet away from each other, on a wide, dirt path, eyes locked on one another, heavily shaken and in need of care. According to Nancy, the boys were visibly suffering from shock. She stated Thom was not responding at all. Their mother and grandmother gave them fluids, wiped the boys down with washcloths, and wrapped them in warm blankets. As they did so, Thom sat staring at a metal bottle top that Matthew was toying with, watching as it reacted strangely to his brother’s touch. The adults watched over the boys, until they dozed off on the living room sofas next to a fire. The later encounter of 1969, involved four members of the Reed family and the night that would finally drive them to sell their home, property and restaurant, the “Village on the Green”. Nancy, Marian, Thom and Matthew were headed home following a horse show, at about 8:00 at night, when they observed what Marian referred to as a bright “floating strip mall” above the left side of the station wagon. The family spoke of what was felt as some sort of force, and a tingling vibe, running through their bodies, before their car coasted to a stop off to the right side of the road. Only the sounds of stones tapping under the fender walls of their car were heard, followed by a dead silence. A barometric change in pressure was also felt before a deafening eruption of katydids and crickets. The family has collectively been able to reconstruct and piece together much of that night in 1969. Thom’s recollection is one of disturbing accounts in a large dark room, and long brightly-illuminated hallways, under a body-encompassing chamber/cylinder, and crying out for one another. Many have asked how the beings appeared and there has been a lot of speculation on the terminology. Thom has described the beings which were witnessed as being a genetically engineered or manufactured intelligent insect-type being with some human characteristics, such as hands, that would stand on two feet and vary from three to five feet in height. After their return to the vehicle, the family experienced a period of disorientation, where it was said that the car was facing a different direction than when it had come to a stop earlier. Thomas ran to his grandmother, who was wandering aimlessly in the middle of the road; Nancy cataleptic in the passenger seat but had been driving earlier; Matthew was unconscious in the fetal position in the backseat.

http://www.ufocasebook.com/2010/reedabduction.html

J. Marion Sims’ experiments—1800’s
Vesicovaginal fistula was a catastrophic complication of childbirth among 19th century American women. The first consistently successful operation for this condition was developed by Dr J Marion Sims, an Alabama surgeon who carried out a series of experimental operations on black slave women between 1845 and 1849. Numerous modern authors have attacked Sims’s medical ethics, arguing that he manipulated the institution of slavery to perform ethically unacceptable human experiments on powerless, unconsenting women. This article reviews these allegations using primary historical source material and concludes that the charges that have been made against Sims are largely without merit. Sims’s modern critics have discounted the enormous suffering experienced by fistula victims, have ignored the controversies that surrounded the introduction of anaesthesia into surgical practice in the middle of the 19th century, and have consistently misrepresented the historical record in their attacks on Sims. Although enslaved African American women certainly represented a “vulnerable population” in the 19th century American South, the evidence suggests that Sims’s original patients were willing participants in his surgical attempts to cure their affliction—a condition for which no other viable therapy existed at that time.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2563360/

J. Marion Sims’ experiments—1800’s

Vesicovaginal fistula was a catastrophic complication of childbirth among 19th century American women. The first consistently successful operation for this condition was developed by Dr J Marion Sims, an Alabama surgeon who carried out a series of experimental operations on black slave women between 1845 and 1849. Numerous modern authors have attacked Sims’s medical ethics, arguing that he manipulated the institution of slavery to perform ethically unacceptable human experiments on powerless, unconsenting women. This article reviews these allegations using primary historical source material and concludes that the charges that have been made against Sims are largely without merit. Sims’s modern critics have discounted the enormous suffering experienced by fistula victims, have ignored the controversies that surrounded the introduction of anaesthesia into surgical practice in the middle of the 19th century, and have consistently misrepresented the historical record in their attacks on Sims. Although enslaved African American women certainly represented a “vulnerable population” in the 19th century American South, the evidence suggests that Sims’s original patients were willing participants in his surgical attempts to cure their affliction—a condition for which no other viable therapy existed at that time.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2563360/