Now You're Afraid of the Dark

Molly // Anthony // Bizarre

In a bizarre twist of events, a dog jumping from the balcony of a 13th floor apartment resulted in a chain-reaction that killed the dog and three other people.
Source. (X-Post from r/wtf)

In a bizarre twist of events, a dog jumping from the balcony of a 13th floor apartment resulted in a chain-reaction that killed the dog and three other people.

Source. (X-Post from r/wtf)

The Phoenix news helicopter collision happened in 2007, as two news AS-350 AStar helicopters were following a police chase. As the helicopter’s camera was pointed at the action on the ground, viewers did not see the other aircraft. KNXV pilot-reporter Craig Smith and anchor Rebecca Thomas were describing events live when Smith was heard to exclaim “Oh, geez!” as the image broke up and violent crashing noises were heard. The station immediately cut away to the studio news anchor, although screaming can be heard in the background before the link is cut off. In footage from the KTVK helicopter, viewers heard the pilot talking about the scene and then the picture just went black. There was no indication of a problem at all. Three other news helicopters from other stations (KSAZKPNX and KPHO) were in the area and began reporting on the crash within seconds of it occurring. Four people were killed: KTVK pilot Scott Bowerbank and photographer Jim Cox; and pilot Craig Smith and photographer Rick Krolak of KNXV. No one on the ground was injured.

Source.

Action Park was an amusement park, open from 1978 to 1996 in Vernon Township,New Jersey at the former Vernon Valley / Great Gorge ski area, now known as Mountain Creek.
Six people are known to have died directly or indirectly from rides at Action Park:
On July 8, 1980, a 19-year-old park employee was riding the Alpine Slide when his car jumped the track and his head struck a rock, killing him.
On July 24, 1982, a 15-year-old boy drowned in the Tidal Wave Pool.
A week later, on August 1, a 27-year-old man from Long Island got out of his tipped kayak on the Kayak Experience to right it. He was electrocuted when he stepped on a grate that was either in contact with, or came too close to, a section of wiring for the underwater fans that was exposed. Several other members of his family nearby were also injured. He was taken to a hospital in nearby Warwick, New York where he died later of cardiac arrest from the electric shock. Accounts differed as to the extent of the exposed wiring: the park said it was “just a nick,” while others said it was closer to 8 inches (20 cm). While the park said it was vindicated, it never reopened the ride, saying that people would be afraid to go on it afterwards.
In 1984, a fatal heart attack suffered by one visitor was unofficially believed to have been triggered by the shock of the cold water in the pool beneath the Tarzan Swing. The water on the Tarzan Swing and in that swimming area was 50-60 °F (10-16 °C) while other water areas were in the 70-80 °F (21-27 °C) range more typical of swimming pools. The Tarzan swing and the cannon ball ride in this area were operated by spring water.
On August 27 of that year, a 20-year-old from Brooklyn drowned in the Tidal Wave Pool.
On July 19, 1987, an 18-year-old drowned in the Tidal Wave Pool.
Source.

Action Park was an amusement park, open from 1978 to 1996 in Vernon Township,New Jersey at the former Vernon Valley / Great Gorge ski area, now known as Mountain Creek.

Six people are known to have died directly or indirectly from rides at Action Park:

  • On July 8, 1980, a 19-year-old park employee was riding the Alpine Slide when his car jumped the track and his head struck a rock, killing him.
  • On July 24, 1982, a 15-year-old boy drowned in the Tidal Wave Pool.
  • A week later, on August 1, a 27-year-old man from Long Island got out of his tipped kayak on the Kayak Experience to right it. He was electrocuted when he stepped on a grate that was either in contact with, or came too close to, a section of wiring for the underwater fans that was exposed. Several other members of his family nearby were also injured. He was taken to a hospital in nearby Warwick, New York where he died later of cardiac arrest from the electric shock. Accounts differed as to the extent of the exposed wiring: the park said it was “just a nick,” while others said it was closer to 8 inches (20 cm). While the park said it was vindicated, it never reopened the ride, saying that people would be afraid to go on it afterwards.
  • In 1984, a fatal heart attack suffered by one visitor was unofficially believed to have been triggered by the shock of the cold water in the pool beneath the Tarzan Swing. The water on the Tarzan Swing and in that swimming area was 50-60 °F (10-16 °C) while other water areas were in the 70-80 °F (21-27 °C) range more typical of swimming pools. The Tarzan swing and the cannon ball ride in this area were operated by spring water.
  • On August 27 of that year, a 20-year-old from Brooklyn drowned in the Tidal Wave Pool.
  • On July 19, 1987, an 18-year-old drowned in the Tidal Wave Pool.

Source.

Elevator number 14 on the second floor of Christus St. Joseph Hospital's George W. Strake building was closed for four days. As Doctor Hitoshi Nikaidoh stepped onto the elevator, the doors closed, pinning his shoulders. “He tried to pull back and he couldn’t,” Physician’s Assistant Karin Steinau told HPD officers. “The doors wouldn’t open.” She wasn’t able to find the Door Open button before the elevator started moving upward. “When you get on an elevator, if it closes on you, it’s supposed to open back up,” she told officers. “There was no hesitation. The doors shut and it went.”
Nikaidoh struggled, trying to shrug out of the elevator, or possibly pull himself inside, she said, but the elevator kept moving upward. The ceiling sliced off most of his head. His left ear, lower lip, teeth and jaw were still attached to his body, which fell to the bottom of the elevator shaft, as the elevator continued moving upward. Steinau frantically pushed every button; the elevator stopped four feet below the fifth floor. She was trapped inside the elevator with his head for more than an hour.
Source.

Elevator number 14 on the second floor of Christus St. Joseph Hospital's George W. Strake building was closed for four days. As Doctor Hitoshi Nikaidoh stepped onto the elevator, the doors closed, pinning his shoulders. “He tried to pull back and he couldn’t,” Physician’s Assistant Karin Steinau told HPD officers. “The doors wouldn’t open.” She wasn’t able to find the Door Open button before the elevator started moving upward. “When you get on an elevator, if it closes on you, it’s supposed to open back up,” she told officers. “There was no hesitation. The doors shut and it went.”

Nikaidoh struggled, trying to shrug out of the elevator, or possibly pull himself inside, she said, but the elevator kept moving upward. The ceiling sliced off most of his head. His left ear, lower lip, teeth and jaw were still attached to his body, which fell to the bottom of the elevator shaft, as the elevator continued moving upward. Steinau frantically pushed every button; the elevator stopped four feet below the fifth floor. She was trapped inside the elevator with his head for more than an hour.

Source.