Now You're Afraid of the Dark

Molly // Anthony // Bizarre

A fun little short film for you all.

The scary part is when you realize you are watching the video.

This website has several short films that I like, including "The Cat With Hands" and "Monsters". Both of which are disturbing, but artful. Enjoy. Love, Anthony.

The Bloody Benders were a family of serial killers who owned a small general store and inn in Osage township, Labette County, Kansas from 1872 to 1873. The inn was a dingy place called the Wayside Inn. The alleged family consisted of John Bender, his wife Kate, son John Jr. and daughter Kate. While most people believe John and Kate were brother and sister, the two were believed to have had a more intimate relationship and some people said that they claimed to be man and wife.
When a guest would stay at the Benders’ bed and breakfast inn, the hosts would give the guest a seat of honor at the table which was positioned over a trap door that led down into the cellar. With the victim’s back to the curtain Kate would distract the guest, while John Bender or his son would come from behind the curtain and strike the guest on the right hand side of the skull with a hammer. The victim’s throat was then cut by one of the women to ensure his death. The body was then dropped through the trap door. Once in the cellar, the body would be stripped and later buried somewhere on the property, often in the orchard. More than a dozen bullet holes were found in the roof and sides of the room and the media speculated that some of the victims had attempted to fight back after being hit with the hammer.
Source.

The Bloody Benders were a family of serial killers who owned a small general store and inn in Osage township, Labette County, Kansas from 1872 to 1873. The inn was a dingy place called the Wayside Inn. The alleged family consisted of John Bender, his wife Kate, son John Jr. and daughter Kate. While most people believe John and Kate were brother and sister, the two were believed to have had a more intimate relationship and some people said that they claimed to be man and wife.

When a guest would stay at the Benders’ bed and breakfast inn, the hosts would give the guest a seat of honor at the table which was positioned over a trap door that led down into the cellar. With the victim’s back to the curtain Kate would distract the guest, while John Bender or his son would come from behind the curtain and strike the guest on the right hand side of the skull with a hammer. The victim’s throat was then cut by one of the women to ensure his death. The body was then dropped through the trap door. Once in the cellar, the body would be stripped and later buried somewhere on the property, often in the orchard. More than a dozen bullet holes were found in the roof and sides of the room and the media speculated that some of the victims had attempted to fight back after being hit with the hammer.

Source.

The Bunny Man is an urban legend originating from two incidents in the town of Burke, Virginia. The first incident was reported by Cadet Bob Bennett and his fiancée Dusty on the night of October 20th, 1970. Around midnight, while returning from a football game, they parked their car in a field on Guinea Road to talk. As they sat in the front seat with the car running, they noticed something moving outside the rear window. Moments later the front passenger window was smashed and there was a white-clad figure standing near the broken window. Bennett turned the car around while the man screamed at them about trespassing. As they drove down the road they discovered a hatchet on the car floor. When the police asked for a description of the man, Bob insisted he was wearing a white suit with long bunny ears.
The second reported sighting occurred on the evening of October 29, 1970, when construction security guard Paul Phillips approached a man standing on the porch of an unfinished home in Kings Park West on Guinea Road. Phillips said the man was wearing a gray, black, and white bunny suit. In the weeks following the incidents, more than 50 people contacted the police claiming to have seen the “bunny man.” Several newspapers reported the incidents, including several articles by the Washington Post.
The overpass on Guinea Road, more commonly nowadays as “Bunny Man Bridge”, now serves as a marker for the urban legend that is the Bunny Man, and some say that skinned rabbit carcasses can be found around the tunnel around Halloween each year.
Source, including the urban legend.

The Bunny Man is an urban legend originating from two incidents in the town of Burke, Virginia. The first incident was reported by Cadet Bob Bennett and his fiancée Dusty on the night of October 20th, 1970. Around midnight, while returning from a football game, they parked their car in a field on Guinea Road to talk. As they sat in the front seat with the car running, they noticed something moving outside the rear window. Moments later the front passenger window was smashed and there was a white-clad figure standing near the broken window. Bennett turned the car around while the man screamed at them about trespassing. As they drove down the road they discovered a hatchet on the car floor. When the police asked for a description of the man, Bob insisted he was wearing a white suit with long bunny ears.

The second reported sighting occurred on the evening of October 29, 1970, when construction security guard Paul Phillips approached a man standing on the porch of an unfinished home in Kings Park West on Guinea Road. Phillips said the man was wearing a gray, black, and white bunny suit. In the weeks following the incidents, more than 50 people contacted the police claiming to have seen the “bunny man.” Several newspapers reported the incidents, including several articles by the Washington Post.

The overpass on Guinea Road, more commonly nowadays as “Bunny Man Bridge”, now serves as a marker for the urban legend that is the Bunny Man, and some say that skinned rabbit carcasses can be found around the tunnel around Halloween each year.

Source, including the urban legend.

H. H. Holmes, (1861 - 1896) born Herman Webster Mudgett, was one of the first documented American serial killers in the modern day sense of the term. Though he confessed to 27 murders, his actual body count could be upwards of 200 victims. He built a 3-story “castle” in a suburb of Chicago, with the upper two floors containing his personal office and a maze of about a hundred windowless rooms. Doorways would open to brick walls, hallways were oddly angled, stairs led into the ceiling, all to confuse and lure guests and staff to their demise. The victim’s bodies were either turned into skeleton models, cremated, or destroyed by lime pits or barrels of acid.

H. H. Holmes, (1861 - 1896) born Herman Webster Mudgett, was one of the first documented American serial killers in the modern day sense of the term. Though he confessed to 27 murders, his actual body count could be upwards of 200 victims. He built a 3-story “castle” in a suburb of Chicago, with the upper two floors containing his personal office and a maze of about a hundred windowless rooms. Doorways would open to brick walls, hallways were oddly angled, stairs led into the ceiling, all to confuse and lure guests and staff to their demise. The victim’s bodies were either turned into skeleton models, cremated, or destroyed by lime pits or barrels of acid.

Stages of Drowning

There are typically five stages to a drowning:

Surprise
In this stage, the victim recognizes danger and becomes afraid. The victim assumes a near-vertical position in the water, with little or no leg movement. The arms will be at or near the water’s surface, making random grasping or flipping motions. The head will be tilted back with the face turned up. Victims rarely make any sounds; they are struggling just to breath.

Involuntary Breath Holding
The victim has now dropped below the static water line and the body, in an attempt to protect itself, initiates involuntary breath holding. This occurs because water has entered the mouth and causes the epiglottis to close over the airway. Though a victim may continue to struggle, he/she will not usually make any sounds as he/she cannot breathe. Without oxygen, the victim will lose consciousness.

Unconsciousness
Because the victim has been without oxygen, the body shuts itself down as unconsciousness results. In this stage, the victim will be motionless. Because breathing has stopped, he/she is in respiratory arrest. There is no chest movement or breathing sounds. At this point, the victim sinks to the bottom of the water, either slowly or rapidly, depending on factors such as the amount of air trapped in the lungs, body weight, and muscle mass. The victim will remain unconscious (and die) unless breathing is reestablished.

Hypoxic Convulsions
Due to the lack of oxygen in the brain, the victim may look as if he/she is having a convulsion, which is why this stage is called the hypoxic convulsion stage. The victim’s skin turns blue, especially in the lips and fingernail beds, and the body may appear rigid. There may be violent jerking of the body and frothing at the mouth.

Clinical Death
The final stage in the drowning process is death. Clinical death occurs when both breathing and circulation stop. The victim is in cardiac arrest. The heart stops pumping blood. The vital organs are no longer receiving oxygen rich blood. The lack of oxygen causes the skin to turn blue.

Source

Annelise Michel (1952 - 1976) was purportedly possessed by demons and eventually underwent an exorcism. Two films have been loosely based on Annelise’s story: The Exorcism of Emily Rose, and Requiem. Being a devout German Catholic, she came to believe she was possessed by demons around the age of 16. These are the audio tapes from her exorcism, in the original German recordings.