Now You're Afraid of the Dark

Molly // Anthony // Bizarre

The Champawat Tiger was a female Bengal tiger responsible for an estimated 430 deaths in Nepal and the Kumaon area of India, mostly during the 19th century. Her attacks have been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the highest number of fatalities from a tiger. She was shot in 1907 by Jim Corbett.

The tiger began her attacks in a region of Nepal close to the Himalayas during the late 19th century, with people being ambushed by the dozen as they walked through the jungle. Hunters were sent in to kill the tiger, but she managed to evade them. Eventually, the Nepalese Army was called in. Despite failing to capture or kill the tiger, soldiers managed to force the tiger to abandon her territory and drive her across the border (River Sarda) into India, where she continued her killing activities in the Kumaon District. She eventually grew bolder, and began killing people in broad daylight and prowling around villages. Life across the region grew paralyzed, with men often refusing to leave their huts for work after hearing the tiger’s roars from the forest.
In 1907, the tiger was killed by British hunter Jim Corbett. The tiger had killed a 16-year-old woman in the town of Champawat, and left a trail of blood and limbs, which Corbett followed. Corbett found the tiger and shot her dead the next day, a dramatic feat confirmed by about 300 villagers.
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The Champawat Tiger was a female Bengal tiger responsible for an estimated 430 deaths in Nepal and the Kumaon area of India, mostly during the 19th century. Her attacks have been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the highest number of fatalities from a tiger. She was shot in 1907 by Jim Corbett.

The tiger began her attacks in a region of Nepal close to the Himalayas during the late 19th century, with people being ambushed by the dozen as they walked through the jungle. Hunters were sent in to kill the tiger, but she managed to evade them. Eventually, the Nepalese Army was called in. Despite failing to capture or kill the tiger, soldiers managed to force the tiger to abandon her territory and drive her across the border (River Sarda) into India, where she continued her killing activities in the Kumaon District. She eventually grew bolder, and began killing people in broad daylight and prowling around villages. Life across the region grew paralyzed, with men often refusing to leave their huts for work after hearing the tiger’s roars from the forest.

In 1907, the tiger was killed by British hunter Jim Corbett. The tiger had killed a 16-year-old woman in the town of Champawat, and left a trail of blood and limbs, which Corbett followed. Corbett found the tiger and shot her dead the next day, a dramatic feat confirmed by about 300 villagers.

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A baby boy was killed after a school girl found him alone in a lift and then allegedly thew him off a balcony.
Yuanyuan, who is thought to be just under two years old, was in a lift with his mother in Chongqing, southwest China.
CCTV footage in the lift shows as his mother was wheeling out his small green bike from the lift the doors abruptly shut.
Seconds before the 10-year-old girl entered the lift and picked up Yuanyuan as the door started to close as his frantic mother sets the bike down. 
The grainy black and white footage shows the schoolgirl, who is wearing a backpack, holding the child for a few seconds before slamming him into the ground.
As he struggles to get back up she repeatedly kicks him, hits him and stamps on him.
When the lift doors open on the 25th floor she is seen grabbing Yuanyuan off the metal floor and pushing him out.
Shanghaiist, an English language Chinese news website, reports that is when the girl threw the child off the building from either a window or a balcony.
The ground outside of the building shows small pools of blood near where the baby was found.
Yuanyuan was taken to a nearby hospital, but he died from the severity of his injuries.
 
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A baby boy was killed after a school girl found him alone in a lift and then allegedly thew him off a balcony.

Yuanyuan, who is thought to be just under two years old, was in a lift with his mother in Chongqing, southwest China.

CCTV footage in the lift shows as his mother was wheeling out his small green bike from the lift the doors abruptly shut.

Seconds before the 10-year-old girl entered the lift and picked up Yuanyuan as the door started to close as his frantic mother sets the bike down. 

The grainy black and white footage shows the schoolgirl, who is wearing a backpack, holding the child for a few seconds before slamming him into the ground.

As he struggles to get back up she repeatedly kicks him, hits him and stamps on him.

When the lift doors open on the 25th floor she is seen grabbing Yuanyuan off the metal floor and pushing him out.

Shanghaiist, an English language Chinese news website, reports that is when the girl threw the child off the building from either a window or a balcony.

The ground outside of the building shows small pools of blood near where the baby was found.

Yuanyuan was taken to a nearby hospital, but he died from the severity of his injuries.

 

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fucknobroarmy:

bizarreism:

**WARNING: GRAPHIC**

Video footage taken by a female passenger on a subway in Guangzhou, China features a 67-year-old retired teacher attacking and attempting to eat a 28-year-old man after he shoved the older man in a rush to get a seat.

did those fucking people just stood there and watched?!

8 Myths and Atrocities About Christopher Columbus and Columbus Day

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

On the second Monday of October each year, Native Americans cringe at the thought of honoring a man who committed atrocities against Indigenous Peoples.

Columbus Day was conceived by the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic Fraternal organization, in the 1930s because they wanted a Catholic hero. After President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the day into law as a federal holiday in 1937, the rest has been history.

In an attempt to further thwart the celebration of this “holiday,” we at ICTMN have outlined eight misnomers and bloody, greedy, sexually perverse and horrendous atrocities committed by Columbus and his men.

emalaith89:

Mummies in Germany

More than 1000 mummies are currently stored in German churches - and many of these bodies are surrounded by their very own mysteries. According to one legend, Caroline Louise von Schönberg (see uppermost picture) had to be tied to her coffin because was still alive during her own burial and began knocking onto the lid. In order to avoid further “disturbances”, Caroline’s children, who had already divided up the inheritance, tied her up and had her buried alive. 

(Source: welt.de)

creepicrawlies:

Bizarre ‘zombie pigeons’ plague Moscow, raising concerns about infectious disease

This sounds like one of those ‘this is how it all started’ movements from a horror movie, but the situation is all too real, and residents of Moscow are concerned about what’s behind a recent plague of what are being called ‘zombie pigeons’ in their city.
Starting last week, dead and dying pigeons have been found littering the streets of Moscow. Reports of the behaviour of those walking around has been very strange, as well, with the birds: “twisting their necks, walking backward in circles or standing completely still with their heads on the ground,” according to The Wall Street Journal.
Read the article

creepicrawlies:

Bizarre ‘zombie pigeons’ plague Moscow, raising concerns about infectious disease

This sounds like one of those ‘this is how it all started’ movements from a horror movie, but the situation is all too real, and residents of Moscow are concerned about what’s behind a recent plague of what are being called ‘zombie pigeons’ in their city.

Starting last week, dead and dying pigeons have been found littering the streets of Moscow. Reports of the behaviour of those walking around has been very strange, as well, with the birds: “twisting their necks, walking backward in circles or standing completely still with their heads on the ground,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

Read the article

theoddmentemporium:

The Paris Morgue was built in 1864 on the Île de la Cité, one of the two islands in the Seine, [and was] where the bodies of unidentified dead – most of them suicide cases – were displayed on marble slabs for friends or family to identify. This edifice soon became a fixture in the Parisian social round, with tens or hundreds of people shuffling into the morgue to gawk at the dead and gossip over their possible origins and reasons for death.
Each day, from early morning to the evening hour of six, the curious of this earth [were] seen going into and coming away from the ugly pile. Persons out of work are impelled by curiosity to go and see the “macchabées,” as the exposed corpses are termed in local slang; but others go to seek on the cold, bare slabs for the body of some dear one who departed this life by suicide or was the victim of an atrocious crime. [Source]
According to  Vanessa R. Schwartz’s book, Spectacular Realities: Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris:

…the morgue transformed the banality everyday life by spectacularizing it. To us, looking at dead bodies seems at best an exercise in morbid curiosity. And some of the late nineteenth-century Parisian press did consider the attraction rather morbid. Yet, as cultural critic Jay Ruby argued, assuming morbidity as the impulse to represent death merely reflects “our culturally encouraged need to deny death.” In fact, although the morgue clearly displayed dead bodies, the discussion of the popularity of public visits to the Paris Morgue generally placed it outside the death-related and morbid topics of its day: cemeteries, slaughterhouses and executions. Instead, the morgue was characterized as “part of the cataloged curiosities of things to see, under the same heading as the Eiffel Tower, Yvete Guilbert, and the Catacombs. [Source]

[With eternal thanks to freckledspace for bringing this particular oddment to my attention]

theoddmentemporium:

The Paris Morgue was built in 1864 on the Île de la Cité, one of the two islands in the Seine, [and was] where the bodies of unidentified dead – most of them suicide cases – were displayed on marble slabs for friends or family to identify. This edifice soon became a fixture in the Parisian social round, with tens or hundreds of people shuffling into the morgue to gawk at the dead and gossip over their possible origins and reasons for death.

Each day, from early morning to the evening hour of six, the curious of this earth [were] seen going into and coming away from the ugly pile. Persons out of work are impelled by curiosity to go and see the “macchabées,” as the exposed corpses are termed in local slang; but others go to seek on the cold, bare slabs for the body of some dear one who departed this life by suicide or was the victim of an atrocious crime. [Source]

According to  Vanessa R. Schwartz’s book, Spectacular Realities: Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris:

…the morgue transformed the banality everyday life by spectacularizing it. To us, looking at dead bodies seems at best an exercise in morbid curiosity. And some of the late nineteenth-century Parisian press did consider the attraction rather morbid. Yet, as cultural critic Jay Ruby argued, assuming morbidity as the impulse to represent death merely reflects “our culturally encouraged need to deny death.” In fact, although the morgue clearly displayed dead bodies, the discussion of the popularity of public visits to the Paris Morgue generally placed it outside the death-related and morbid topics of its day: cemeteries, slaughterhouses and executions. Instead, the morgue was characterized as “part of the cataloged curiosities of things to see, under the same heading as the Eiffel Tower, Yvete Guilbert, and the Catacombs. [Source]

[With eternal thanks to freckledspace for bringing this particular oddment to my attention]

Ever wonder what auditory hallucinations sound like? With headphones or good surround sound, now you too can get the full experience of psychosis.

This may be a trigger for some.

In this video, we have four kids wandering around looking for a ghost in an abandoned school in Iraq (one description says India, but since they’re speaking Arabic we’ll go with Iraq). The boys are kind of wandering aimlessly through stairwells and empty classrooms for a solid two minutes, which would arouse suspicion under our “Why is anyone filming this?” rule if not for the fact that we know they are explicitly waiting for the lights to suddenly dim and for a hallway full of disembodied 19th century clothes to start doing the Monster Mash. That doesn’t happen. What happens is much creepier. A headless goddamned ghost appears right in goddamned front of them. You literally see it materialize on camera. As they swing the camera lazily through the room, the ghost just walks very purposefully toward them like it’s delivering a pizza, while a long, low moan emanates from its phantom lungs.

YouTube commenters seem to think the ghost is simply one of the boys who went to go look out the window; that the bright light coming through obscures his head and gives him a washed-out ghostly look for the camera. But again, watch the video — when the camera sweeps across the floor a few seconds earlier, nobody is standing there.

If this is all an accident of the lighting and their shitty cell-phone cameras, then it was a lucky damned accident, considering they were specifically there to hunt ghosts in what they thought was a haunted abandoned building. If they doctored the video with effects later, then this is a remarkably subtle job. These are giggling teenagers goofing around, and we’re pretty sure they gave us a creepier ghost effect than any of the Paranormal Activity movies. So good job, guys — you successfully creeped us out, one way or another.

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One wheel motorcycle (invented by Italian M. Goventosa de Udine). Maximum speed: 150 kilometers per hour ( 93 Mph).
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One wheel motorcycle (invented by Italian M. Goventosa de Udine). Maximum speed: 150 kilometers per hour ( 93 Mph).

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